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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ELM View Post
    So just how big was that 2 x mother of a case, it looks huge.
    I had only read of a heated build area after I logged off last night. Guy had wrapped insulating foil around his printer but they did not say what temperature he had inside. I was curious what sort of effect that would have on the print media and feed also would you need much more supporting media?
    When doing that sort of work, two heads better than one, second head the support crew?
    The case was for mini itx boards so it ended up being about 11" x 8" x 6".

    The university I attend will do prints on the Fortus 400 for 6$ a cubic inch (and often free for student teams) so I'm used to a printer that can do any geometry and size consistantly and accurately. I consider dual extruders with soluble support essential.

    I also believe that the idle extruder should be actuated out of the way to avoid oozing and z alignment problems. The
    Stratasys printers all lift the idle extruder and wipe the nozzles for every switch.

    AFAIK 70c is the normal build chamber temperature for printing ABS. Proper design of a heated build chamber can be quite involved for a few reasons. First, most extruders are designed to be fan cooled so they might not perform reliably if the ambient temperature is 70c. Secondly, it can be beneficial to blow cold air at the point of extrusion when printing to help the plastic set faster.

    Putting the whole printer in a warm box makes the above two problems difficult to solve, and may also impact the life of the electronics, motors and linear motion.

    Stratasys designs their heated chamber in two ways. The older printers put both extruders in a box and pump cold air through a duct. The extruders therefore get a fresh supply of cold air, which can exit downwards and cool the print as well.
    DSC00480.jpg

    DSC00476.jpg
    The disadvantage of this solution is that the heated build chamber needs a lot of extra volume to properly manage the ducting.

    Their newer printers seem to use bellows to completely separate the extruder from the heated chamber.
    fxGDOh.jpg

    dbh3v.jpg
    This solution keeps the heated chamber as small as possible, and makes wire/filament management much easier.

  2. #12
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    Size always matters...

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dixon8402 View Post
    Size always matters...
    Oh yes it does... and you can check with Godzilla

    The disadvantage of this solution is that the heated build chamber needs a lot of extra volume to properly manage the ducting.
    Even so, it only means the mechanical setup needs to be a bit bigger. I'm not sure why this is a problem because many CNC routers are meters by meters in size.

  4. #14
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    This is more like it !


    The Largest Ever 3D Printed Wrench!

  5. #15
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    Feb 2014
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    Thanks for the explanation & photo's 691175002, the bellows system looks very efficient but not as easy to first build.
    I don't know why (not seeing one before I guess helps), but I always imagined that having two heads, they would be on a separate parallel axis, not fitted ridged next to each other. There you go, interesting.

    Eddie

  6. #16
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    Generally, the larger your platform is, the less accurate the print will be. Technology has definitely come a long way, although it is still lagging a bit in terms of size/quality. The large multi-thousands machines will be able to compensate this a bit but who has the money to afford them anyway? Personally I role with the Chiron, which I got from Anycubic Chiron 3D Printer | Free & Fast Delivery | Dibbsto UK. It lets you create up to 40cm*40cm*45cm builds which can include functional parts.

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