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View Full Version : I have built an cnc router, but i want to build an 3d printer as well :)



Vegabond
01-31-2014, 06:51 PM
Do someone know a kit on ebay or something that i can buy so i just need to think about the mechanic?
I don`t know so much about the 3d printers, so maby an youtube video of how its work would be fine?


Greetings from a new member, Robert :)

neilw20
01-31-2014, 07:48 PM
Try this..
Open Heacent RepRap Prusa Mendel 3DP02 3D Printer Assembly Kit /0.3mm Nozzle/1.75mm Filament - Free Shipping - DealExtreme (http://dx.com/p/heacent-3dp02-3d-printer-assembly-kit-238922)

ShuttleSpace
02-01-2014, 04:07 PM
Hi Robert, welcome , I hope to do the same thing soon with my 48 X 96 X 6(Zaxis) ShopBot, still have some homework to do...
Looks like OscarH has done something already:
http://www.3dprintforums.com/diy-3d-printer-machines/converted-multipurpose-3d-printing-routers-mills/83-converted-mill-3d-printing.html?highlight=head
Prusa Nozzle (http://prusanozzle.org/)

Consider what you will be making before getting anything. There's a lot of new stuff coming these days and it's getting cheaper.
Good luck.

Vegabond
02-01-2014, 07:02 PM
Ok, thanks for the links.

Is there some kit that i can buy, with all the electronics that i can buy? so can i fiks the mechanics my self?
Im an mechanical engineer and have a lot of machines on my work :):) Waterjet, 5 axis mills and lathes.


Greetings from Robert.

ShuttleSpace
02-02-2014, 10:41 AM
Not sure what you're making or what controllers you already have yet. There's a lot of info out there...

J-Head Nozzles (http://jheadnozzle.blogspot.ca/)

https://www.google.ca/search?q=hot+head+extruder&rlz=1C1GGGE_enHK403CA474&espv=210&es_sm=122&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=OnPuUpurK-Gx2QXMnYHYDg&ved=0CFoQsAQ&biw=930&bih=414#imgdii=_

Gadget
02-03-2014, 08:47 AM
I built my first 3D printer attachment for my existing CNC table using the plans here. 2BEIGH3 3D Printer Update and call for Testers (http://www.instructables.com/id/2BEIGH3-3D-Printer-Update-and-call-for-Testers/) I learned enough about things with that design to be able to make a better all metal printer attachment, one of my own design.

ShuttleSpace
02-03-2014, 11:17 AM
Hi Gadget, do you think it would be possible to have the filament feed activated by a micoswitch rather than the controller. Z axis moves down to position and the feed starts?
I'm also thinking of using a can of polyurethane foam...could just have a mechanical operator on my Z axis for this.

Bx3mE
02-10-2014, 03:27 PM
Making a conversion is not so hard if you hook up existing drivers to a RAMPS style controller and add a extruder and a hot end. But if you want to keep the machines existing function you will have to integrate the extruder you are adding with the controller you already have. Depending on the software and hardware you have this can get complicated. I have a thread where i make this kind of conversion in the DIY Conversions section but it will take a while before that build is done.

flateric
02-11-2014, 10:07 PM
The conversion can and has been done, but the question really is...should it be done?

Well on the surafce both machine appear to have very many similarities, this quickly will show to be a less than ideal way of getting into the 3D printer game.

If you have built a CNC machine you have tackled the more difficult project of the two and easily the more expensive project.

Cnc machines require extreme strength and require also to be very rigid with less emphasis on speed of the work head than with a 3D printer.

A 3D printer must also be very rigid for true success and accuracy, but need not have even close to the strength to resist torque and forces exerted by the working head, arguably there are little to no forces fed back into the structure. This allows for low weight weaker components to be used. Such as rollers and extruded aluminium guides rather than the far more expensive and also heavier linear rails and components. The net of this is that low weight and lack of feedback force allows very high speed movement and print speeds that are not only nice, but needed for some printing operations such as bridging and proper tempurature to be maintained or cooled during print (material dependant)

You will find that if you have ventured down the CNC path and now wish to go the 3D print route that you have fewer hardware hurdles to jump, but perhaps more software and system settings to tackle. The 3D printer direction is generally far cheaper (DIY filament extrusion types) for setup and build.

My personal experience anyways, your milage may vary.

Blackrat
02-12-2014, 03:59 AM
using your cnc machine you should be able to make a neat 3d printer

i just wish i had the time

tahustvedt
02-14-2014, 04:11 PM
The conversion can and has been done, but the question really is...should it be done?

Well on the surafce both machine appear to have very many similarities, this quickly will show to be a less than ideal way of getting into the 3D printer game.

If you have built a CNC machine you have tackled the more difficult project of the two and easily the more expensive project.

Cnc machines require extreme strength and require also to be very rigid with less emphasis on speed of the work head than with a 3D printer.

A 3D printer must also be very rigid for true success and accuracy, but need not have even close to the strength to resist torque and forces exerted by the working head, arguably there are little to no forces fed back into the structure. This allows for low weight weaker components to be used. Such as rollers and extruded aluminium guides rather than the far more expensive and also heavier linear rails and components. The net of this is that low weight and lack of feedback force allows very high speed movement and print speeds that are not only nice, but needed for some printing operations such as bridging and proper tempurature to be maintained or cooled during print (material dependant)

You will find that if you have ventured down the CNC path and now wish to go the 3D print route that you have fewer hardware hurdles to jump, but perhaps more software and system settings to tackle. The 3D printer direction is generally far cheaper (DIY filament extrusion types) for setup and build.

My personal experience anyways, your milage may vary.

What speeds and acceleration rates are needed to print well in your opinion?

I'm also wondering whether I should make an add on to my router or make a new machine.

Gadget
02-15-2014, 07:55 AM
Hi Gadget, do you think it would be possible to have the filament feed activated by a micoswitch rather than the controller. Z axis moves down to position and the feed starts?
I'm also thinking of using a can of polyurethane foam...could just have a mechanical operator on my Z axis for this.
I suppose it could be done with a microswitch if you had variable reliable control of the feed. Getting that kind of accuracy on the feed mechanism would be rather difficult though. Also, most slice programs handle the feed as if it were line length not on and off. You would also have to figure out a way to have retraction on the rapid move of the print head. In my opinion it would be harder to get it to work that way than it would be to go with the proven method.
As for the foam, doesn't that expand when released? No way to control the expansion rate so you would wind up with a pile of fluff I think.
If you already have a CNC table I'd just add a fourth controller and motor to handle the filament feed and add a hot end. It's a pretty cheap solution. The print head/ extruder could be made to bolt on quickly to the existing CNC table. That's how I handle mine. I also put a disconnect to the extruder axis control cable so when I remove the 3D all associated wires are removed as well. Be POSITIVE there is no power on the line when disconnecting though, it will blow the drivers. I put a switch across the CNC power supply feed to short any residual power stored in the capacitors before removing the control cable. As a safety measure, I also put a double pole switch in the power supply lines between the PS and controller and turn that off removing any chance of stray voltage being present on the controller when removing the fourth axis.

dixon8402
04-07-2014, 09:27 AM
I too was interested in a CNC/3d printer combo, but after lots of reading and questions in this forum, I have decided on keeping the machines separate. There are just way more benefits of doing it this way.

twistyme
11-16-2014, 07:57 PM
"Try this..
Open Heacent RepRap Prusa Mendel 3DP02 3D Printer Assembly Kit /0.3mm Nozzle/1.75mm Filament - Free Shipping - DealExtreme"

No DONT TRY THAT. Load of crap these machines and theyve been being sent out with broken Melzi controller boards from some suppliers. Save your money and your time. Get something more reliable like a Robo3D pre-built and with Customer Service support.