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Xienix
01-15-2014, 02:44 PM
Good afternoon/morning people of 3DStuffZone

let me start with a story on how I get on this site.
I am 1 and a half year away from finishing highschool and we've got something called a PWS
and since it is dutch I can't literally translate it into english but it means you have to work in pairs of 2 people and do a research on something for atleast 80 hours.
Since 3D printing is going to be used more and more these days we asked if we could make a 3D printer ourself instead of doing a 80 hours long research.

The day before that my dad offered his knowledge because he already made a kinda 3D printer but instead of printing it cuts away the parts that arn't neserry
(something like this: http://img0051.popscreencdn.com/107088882_cnc-router-plans-kit-mill-milling-machine-plasma-rapid-.jpg )
He says that he has the most important/expencive parts but instead of let my dad tell me everything about it we'd like to do a little research ourself (parts,software etc)
but since we never build a 3D printer we have no idea where to start
could someone give us a push in the right direction?

thanks :)

ShuttleSpace
01-15-2014, 10:36 PM
Hi there, good for you, the schools are far behind with teaching this, you will leap ahead.
Maybe start with saying what you do know.
Do you know about 3D models and motion control?

Xienix
01-16-2014, 01:27 AM
Hi there, good for you, the schools are far behind with teaching this, you will leap ahead.
Maybe start with saying what you do know.
Do you know about 3D models and motion control?

I was intrested in 3D modeling a few years ago so I know how to make some basic 3D models in 3Dsmax but that is all I know about 3D models
And motion control is control with motion I guess (xbox kinect) but I can't explain the technique behind it though.

258cj7
01-16-2014, 08:57 AM
First thing you need to decide is which type of printer you want to build. You can go with a fused deposition (FDM) or a photosolidification (SLA) process. Each has it's advantages and drawbacks. What do you want to print. What are the properties you are looking for? Size, strength, detail?

ShuttleSpace
01-16-2014, 09:09 AM
The 3D models are points in space, each point has X,Y and Z coordinates.
The control software tells the machine to travel to these points.

https://www.google.ca/search?q=cnc+fundamentals+and+programming&rlz=1C1GGGE_enHK403CA474&oq=CNC+fundamentals&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l5.13159j0j4&sourceid=chrome&espv=210&es_sm=122&ie=UTF-8#q=cnc+fundamentals+and+programming&tbm=vid

Xienix
01-16-2014, 11:36 AM
First thing you need to decide is which type of printer you want to build. You can go with a fused deposition (FDM) or a photosolidification (SLA) process. Each has it's advantages and drawbacks. What do you want to print. What are the properties you are looking for? Size, strength, detail?

I'll go with the FDM because I don't like to work with a laser,the platic rolls are cheaper and it I'd like to see what the machine is actually doing instead of a object that slowly rises from a (expensive) liquid.




The 3D models are points in space, each point has X,Y and Z coordinates.
The control software tells the machine to travel to these points.

https://www.google.ca/search?q=cnc+fundamentals+and+programming&rlz=1C1GGGE_enHK403CA474&oq=CNC+fundamentals&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l5.13159j0j4&sourceid=chrome&espv=210&es_sm=122&ie=UTF-8#q=cnc+fundamentals+and+programming&tbm=vid

thanks, I'll try to follow some tutorials and hopfully understand it a bit better

Paragon Spirit
01-17-2014, 09:10 AM
I am sure to have forgotten something, but (with the help of my friend Google), a quick list of components in a generic form, in no particular order:

Build Plate - This is the surface that the material is deposited on to, heated is better but not required.
Frame - supports the build plate and all the other components, plywood, mdf, steel, whatever is handy, but rigidity matters (depending on the rest of the components)
Extrusion Head - This will affect level of detail and many other elements of your printer, put some effort into chosing one appropriate for your needs.
Stepper motors - move the extrusion head around the build region allowing it to deposit material. The number of steps also affects buld precision but adds cost. These are different than generic electric motors in that they have a sensor (of some sort) that allows the motor to be told to turn a specific number of times and travel a pre-defined distance.
Control Panel - This is the element that translates from the computer to the printer and controls all motion.
Gears - everybody loves gears! Threaded rods also fit into this category, the transfer the motion of the motors to the extrusion head.
Fasteners and all the rest.

I feel as though I've forgotten at least one thing, but that is part of the adventure!

Note: there are several open source FDM projects which include a bill of materials and plenty of specification drawings and details. I am sure they would be a valuable starting place for your project.

Para

Xienix
01-18-2014, 02:27 PM
I am sure to have forgotten something, but (with the help of my friend Google), a quick list of components in a generic form, in no particular order:


Note: there are several open source FDM projects which include a bill of materials and plenty of specification drawings and details. I am sure they would be a valuable starting place for your project.

Para

Thanks for the whole material list.
I've tried to search for those FDM projects but without much success...perhaps the problem was that I searched on 3D printer blue print instead of open course FDM project.
Anyway I'll try to search again with this new knowledge :)

Paragon Spirit
01-19-2014, 12:46 AM
The term "bill of materials" was one that once i found yielded a wealth of information.

If you see a site with things you don't fully understand, be sure to ask!

Fastest1
01-19-2014, 09:34 AM
What is wrong with working with a laser? They look fun too.

Paragon Spirit
01-19-2014, 09:47 AM
http://muldoonshealthphysicspage.com/DangLaser.gif

Fastest1
01-20-2014, 08:15 AM
Now that is funny. Maybe not to the person the sign is referring to.

Paragon Spirit
01-21-2014, 08:52 AM
Yea, I've had a printout of it in a few of my workshops over the years. Drives home a safety message that some people don't quite get.

For the Original Poster, I think using a laser based printer is a completely safe option if you have one built properly to plan and take the appropriate safety precautions. The most important consideration is where your interests lie and what you want to accomplish with the 3d Printer.

Xienix
02-06-2014, 10:10 AM
sorry for the late respose everyone but I had a week full with tests and I needed some time to prepare for that.



If you see a site with things you don't fully understand, be sure to ask!
I try to search it first but if i really do not understand it then i will ask.
Such nice people here :)


What is wrong with working with a laser? They look fun too.


For the Original Poster, I think using a laser based printer is a completely safe option if you have one built properly to plan and take the appropriate safety precautions. The most important consideration is where your interests lie and what you want to accomplish with the 3d Printer.

I already made some plans for a FDM printer in my head
and I cannot find the good things/bad things about the SLA/FDM printer.....

I also drew some stuff (am not a artist)
The idea (don't try to read the text my hand writing is terrible and it is also written in dutch) http://i.imgur.com/yQZffuT.jpg

''final'' http://i.imgur.com/3HFln1I.jpg?1 not the final idea because 7 motors are to many for a 3 axis system
It also needs some support things

MatthewBasaraba
02-07-2014, 09:18 PM
Well you got some great advice from people. Now that you know WHAT you want to print, you need to decide how big you want it to be. In my opinion, the cost of making a bigger envelope machine is well worth it since the most expensive parts dont care how big the machine is. The motors turn the same for a 200mm machine and a 2000mm machine, only thing that changes is the code for the program.

People might not like Google SketchUp but I have used many different CAD software and for high tech geometric design I would go with an expensive software, but for someone designing their frame and simple geometry parts, SketchUp is super easy to learn, its free, and has a very nice STL (format for slice software, like ReplicatorG and MakerWare, to make programs). I recommend you download it and check out tutorials on YouTube on how to use it. CAD will be the basis for EVERYTHING for your printer.

I will say at this point that you CAN make a printer for cheaper than you can buy some, HOWEVER, I bought a FlashForge Creator for $1200. I have over 1300 WORKING hours on the printer, have made over $7000 PROFIT from parts I make, and it is still going strong, so you might want to BUY one instead. You might save $500 IF you have a perfect design your first try but 100 to 1 you wont since you do not have any experience in BUILDING a machine from scratch and it will be iffy how durable it will be.

Let me give you some ideas on costs it took to build my printer.

RAMPs electronics: $109
SEMA 23 185oz motors x3 :$88
Heatbed and power supply $175 (both are really big, much bigger than you would need)
Anti Back Lash Ball Screws 16mm by 650mm x 2: $200
3650mm stick of extrusion x 3= $111
fasteners, like screws and brackets= $50 (conservative estimate)
10mm x 650mm Linear bars x 8 = $160
extruder= $90

That's already $983

There is more and more that I am not putting down, these were just the main items.


That being said...

First thing I did when I designed my printer was determine how big I wanted it to print, I went with 18x18x18.
Second when determining your frame, what axis do you want to move. I wanted my extruder to move on X and Y and my bed to move on Z.
Third I decided WHAT materials I wanted to make it from, mine is mainly extruded aluminum.
Fourth get pricing for your parts needed to make the machine.

Try to focus on ONE thing at a time.

Example:
1. Frame
2. Axis'
3. Electronics

I noticed on your sketches it looks like you want to use ball screws on X and Y axis. While this is smooth and accurate it is usually VERY slow and expensive compared to belts and pulleys.

James
02-08-2014, 03:03 AM
I love your engineering drawings! :D Reminds me of when I used to draw out my designs on paper years ago. Our drawings look the same! For you to be able to draw that design tells me that you are very mechanically inclined. That's great! That means you'll one day be able to build anything you can think of! :D

You'll want to start drawing in 3D, because it is a lot quicker and easier than drawing on paper. Try DesignSpark Mechanical (http://www.designspark.com/eng/page/mechanical). It's free and I ASSURE YOU it is the very most easiest yet most capable 3D modeling software you can find. It's SpaceClaim! SpaceClaim is an advanced CAD, Computer Aided Design, software package used by some of the biggest companies and institutions in the world. The difference is, DesignSpark Mechanical doesn't have all of the advanced commands of SpaceClaim, but when you would like to try the full version of SpaceClaim you can get a Student license for only $50 US dollars.

As you're researching about FDM printers, try using the term FFF. FFF, Fused Filament Fabrication, is the exact same process as FDM, but it has a different name. It has a different name because of a company called Stratasys, which owns the trademark for the term FDM, Fused Deposition Modeling, and doesn't like anyone using their trademark. The people who invented the term FFF are RepRap found here (http://reprap.org/wiki/Main_Page).

So you want to build your own FDM 3D printer? Yep! You can do it! I can tell that you can do it because I saw your drawings, so from that I know that you can. To design one from scratch is possible, but it might take you too long to do. If you have the time then do it! That would be great for you to learn! If you don't have the time then there are two things you can do. You can use open source plans and build all the parts yourself or, you can buy a kit. The easiest to build FFF 3D printer one can build from scratch using open source plans is the Printrbot Simple, found here (http://printrbot.com/tag/open-source/). Or, if you want to build one from a kit they sell a kit (http://printrbot.com/shop/printrbot-simple/) for $349 US dollars.

I think the very best FFF 3D printer that one can get for the money is this one (https://www.phoenix3dprinter.com/). For only $375 US dollars one can get a kit that has more than four times the build volume of the Printrbot Simple. It also includes a heated build platform so one can print in ABS. And for only $100 US dollars more one can add a second extruder, which lets one print in two colors or print a single color with a dissolvable support material. Another reason why it's the best is they produced their own closed source software that lets one restart a print if there is a malfunction of some kind some time during a print job. For all other printer controller software out there, one would need to start over from the start and when a print job can take 10 hours or more that becomes a very big deal, being able to fix the problem and finish from where it stopped.

You're Dutch? I like the Dutch! The Dutch are so cool! Have you ever heard of Shapeways? Shapeways is a HUGE 3D printing company that is based in Eindhoven. I like the Dutch so much I even have a thread that I made in their forum about Holland (http://www.shapeways.com/forum/index.php?t=msg&goto=68108). I'd like to go there some day and buy me some wooden shoes. hehe :p

winterfalke
02-08-2014, 02:56 PM
I noticed on your sketches it looks like you want to use ball screws on X and Y axis. While this is smooth and accurate it is usually VERY slow and expensive compared to belts and pulleys.

I am curious why you think that ballscrews are so much slower than belts? Our newer CNC machines with balls crew drives are capable of 1200 inches/minute movement at 100 inches/second/second acceleration with an accuracy of under .00005 inches. While this is several degrees of magnitude more expensive and complicated than what he wants to build, the same motor can turn a ballscrew or a pulley. It is all dependent on gearing; the pulley needs to turn far slower than the ballscrew to achieve the same motion, but a motor can be geared to go as fast or as slow as you want it. The big difference is cost, the pulley is significantly cheaper, and the increased accuracy of a ballscrew will be negated by the gearing to make a slower motor turn it fast enough.

MatthewBasaraba
02-08-2014, 03:44 PM
The way the drawing shows it looks like the motors will be mounted 1:1 on the ball screws. Also from the drawing 2 ball screws on Y direction he will still be required to use belts and pulleys unless he plans on using 2 motors on Y and slaving them.

Bx3mE
02-10-2014, 03:06 PM
Hi! I think you are in the very beginning of something you will spend many hours with and have a lot of fun with.
Depending of your electronics skills and budget there is always the option to do a scrap parts build! Use the RepRap:s family as a reference invest the most of your budget into a known to work well controller with drivers (And you can get your money back if deciding to change route) and gather the rest from scraps... I am currently doing my share of collecting scraps for a build i will do later this spring. So far i used 3 hours dissembling printers, scanners, hdd drives and dvd players, carefully not to damage the parts i want. Useful parts are so far: neodym magnets, 15 steel rods 8 belts with matching pulleys, 9 steppers, 4 rails, complete z-axis for mini laser from DVD and the list goes on. when opening DVD:s - CONSULT YOUR PARENTS AND OR TEACHERS BEFORE USING ANY COMPONENTS. These many times contain fine useful stuff as laser diodes, lm317 circuits for voltage regulation, caps, (macro lense for your phones as a side note) but most of all very good steppers (120 steps per rotation in some cases). It can be a little bit more tricky to build like this but creative minds like yours will surely find solutions for rising problems. AND the satisfaction of making your own construction is HUGE!

MatthewBasaraba
02-10-2014, 04:27 PM
Thats a good idea Bx3, I may need to find out where they haul those out around here.

Where do you find them to salvage?

i04p
02-10-2014, 06:16 PM
I would imagine browsing through the catalogs from various bearing companies would be important. Also, there is a website called www.mekanizmalar.com that has a bunch of great videos showing a tons of different types of mechanical configurations for solving problems. If your building things from scratch that is.

James
02-10-2014, 08:01 PM
See my post #16. It did not post correctly due to a problem with the system. :)

Nchapman
02-10-2014, 08:27 PM
Whenever I help someone getting started in 3d printing I have them check out Reprap.org. This is by far the best resource on anything to do with printing. Like others have stated you need to determine what technology you are looking to use. I personally like SLA printers just for the fact the accuracy is a little better. Now if you aren't comfortable with lasers you could always use a dlp projector.

Someone mentioned ball screws earlier and these will give you better results but like they said is a little slower. Another thing to think about is possibly using a closed loop system as most printers(FDM) are open loop with looses a little accuracy as it has no way of tracking where it is to where it should be. Now saying that most wouldn't be able to tell.

The current market is driving the kit prices down, making them a better price that procuring pieces on there own.

Xienix
02-21-2014, 11:51 AM
I need to check this forum more frequently...
anyways

Well you got some great advice from people. Now that you know WHAT you want to print, you need to decide how big you want it to be. In my opinion, the cost of making a bigger envelope machine is well worth it since the most expensive parts dont care how big the machine is. The motors turn the same for a 200mm machine and a 2000mm machine, only thing that changes is the code for the program.

I am aiming for a 600mm*600mm*600mm


People might not like Google SketchUp but I have used many different CAD software and for high tech geometric design I would go with an expensive software, but for someone designing their frame and simple geometry parts, SketchUp is super easy to learn, its free, and has a very nice STL (format for slice software, like ReplicatorG and MakerWare, to make programs). I recommend you download it and check out tutorials on YouTube on how to use it. CAD will be the basis for EVERYTHING for your printer.

thanks, I already looked into SketchUp and I have to agree it's very easy to learn indeed


I will say at this point that you CAN make a printer for cheaper than you can buy some, HOWEVER, I bought a FlashForge Creator for $1200. I have over 1300 WORKING hours on the printer, have made over $7000 PROFIT from parts I make, and it is still going strong, so you might want to BUY one instead. You might save $500 IF you have a perfect design your first try but 100 to 1 you wont since you do not have any experience in BUILDING a machine from scratch and it will be iffy how durable it will be.

well...the making and designing of the 3D printer is a HUGE part of the project...so buying a 3D printer and then following the instructions is kinda cheating in my opinion


Let me give you some ideas on costs it took to build my printer.

RAMPs electronics: $109
SEMA 23 185oz motors x3 :$88
Heatbed and power supply $175 (both are really big, much bigger than you would need)
Anti Back Lash Ball Screws 16mm by 650mm x 2: $200
3650mm stick of extrusion x 3= $111
fasteners, like screws and brackets= $50 (conservative estimate)
10mm x 650mm Linear bars x 8 = $160
extruder= $90

That's already $983

There is more and more that I am not putting down, these were just the main items.


I know it's not a cheap project to work on but the whole experience from designing and making it can be useful in the future and it's fun to do of course.


That being said...

First thing I did when I designed my printer was determine how big I wanted it to print, I went with 18x18x18.
Second when determining your frame, what axis do you want to move. I wanted my extruder to move on X and Y and my bed to move on Z.
Third I decided WHAT materials I wanted to make it from, mine is mainly extruded aluminum.
Fourth get pricing for your parts needed to make the machine.

Like I said before we are going with a 600mm*600mm*600mm
I also want to let the extruder move on X,Y and Z but me and my PWS partner are both going to make a design and then
choose the best one or combine them to a better design
and I was thinking to make it from extruded aluminum aswell (I did not now the english translation of it, thanks :)


Try to focus on ONE thing at a time.

Example:
1. Frame
2. Axis'
3. Electronics

good one



I noticed on your sketches it looks like you want to use ball screws on X and Y axis. While this is smooth and accurate it is usually VERY slow and expensive compared to belts and pulleys.

you said it yourself they are smooth and accurate and that's were we're going for



I love your engineering drawings! :D Reminds me of when I used to draw out my designs on paper years ago. Our drawings look the same! For you to be able to draw that design tells me that you are very mechanically inclined. That's great! That means you'll one day be able to build anything you can think of! :D


I used to draw perspective/manga back in the day but I gave up very quickly.
nha being able to draw a thing does not mean being able to build it I think.




You'll want to start drawing in 3D, because it is a lot quicker and easier than drawing on paper. Try DesignSpark Mechanical (http://www.designspark.com/eng/page/mechanical). It's free and I ASSURE YOU it is the very most easiest yet most capable 3D modeling software you can find. It's SpaceClaim! SpaceClaim is an advanced CAD, Computer Aided Design, software package used by some of the biggest companies and institutions in the world. The difference is, DesignSpark Mechanical doesn't have all of the advanced commands of SpaceClaim, but when you would like to try the full version of SpaceClaim you can get a Student license for only $50 US dollars.

thanks!
[1 hour later]
do you perhaps know where I can find a basic tutorial series?
I can follow some random tutorials on youtube but that's copying what and not knowing what I just did


As you're researching about FDM printers, try using the term FFF. FFF, Fused Filament Fabrication, is the exact same process as FDM, but it has a different name. It has a different name because of a company called Stratasys, which owns the trademark for the term FDM, Fused Deposition Modeling, and doesn't like anyone using their trademark. The people who invented the term FFF are RepRap found here (http://reprap.org/wiki/Main_Page).

I actually found out about this yesterday but thanks for posting anyways :)


So you want to build your own FDM 3D printer? Yep! You can do it! I can tell that you can do it because I saw your drawings, so from that I know that you can. To design one from scratch is possible, but it might take you too long to do. If you have the time then do it! That would be great for you to learn! If you don't have the time then there are two things you can do. You can use open source plans and build all the parts yourself or, you can buy a kit. The easiest to build FFF 3D printer one can build from scratch using open source plans is the Printrbot Simple, found here (http://printrbot.com/tag/open-source/). Or, if you want to build one from a kit they sell a kit (http://printrbot.com/shop/printrbot-simple/) for $349 US dollars.

buying a 3D printer is cheating in my opinion....but those open source plans are very helpful :)




I think the very best FFF 3D printer that one can get for the money is this one (https://www.phoenix3dprinter.com/). For only $375 US dollars one can get a kit that has more than four times the build volume of the Printrbot Simple. It also includes a heated build platform so one can print in ABS. And for only $100 US dollars more one can add a second extruder, which lets one print in two colors or print a single color with a dissolvable support material. Another reason why it's the best is they produced their own closed source software that lets one restart a print if there is a malfunction of some kind some time during a print job. For all other printer controller software out there, one would need to start over from the start and when a print job can take 10 hours or more that becomes a very big deal, being able to fix the problem and finish from where it stopped.



buying a 3D printer is cheating in my opinion



You're Dutch? I like the Dutch! The Dutch are so cool! Have you ever heard of Shapeways? Shapeways is a HUGE 3D printing company that is based in Eindhoven. I like the Dutch so much I even have a thread that I made in their forum about Holland (http://www.shapeways.com/forum/index.php?t=msg&goto=68108). I'd like to go there some day and buy me some wooden shoes. hehe :p

no, i've never heard about Shapeways before thanks :)
haha yea the wooden shoes :P
do you know why the dutch used them?
if no then -> farmers used the wooden shoes to prevent cows/horses and other heavy animals from standing directly on their feets, early safety shoes actually :P


Hi! I think you are in the very beginning of something you will spend many hours with and have a lot of fun with.
Depending of your electronics skills and budget there is always the option to do a scrap parts build! Use the RepRap:s family as a reference invest the most of your budget into a known to work well controller with drivers (And you can get your money back if deciding to change route) and gather the rest from scraps... I am currently doing my share of collecting scraps for a build i will do later this spring. So far i used 3 hours dissembling printers, scanners, hdd drives and dvd players, carefully not to damage the parts i want. Useful parts are so far: neodym magnets, 15 steel rods 8 belts with matching pulleys, 9 steppers, 4 rails, complete z-axis for mini laser from DVD and the list goes on. when opening DVD:s - CONSULT YOUR PARENTS AND OR TEACHERS BEFORE USING ANY COMPONENTS. These many times contain fine useful stuff as laser diodes, lm317 circuits for voltage regulation, caps, (macro lense for your phones as a side note) but most of all very good steppers (120 steps per rotation in some cases). It can be a little bit more tricky to build like this but creative minds like yours will surely find solutions for rising problems. AND the satisfaction of making your own construction is HUGE!

...well...my dad threw all the ''old'' electronics away a week ago so I don't think we've got any scraps left...



I would imagine browsing through the catalogs from various bearing companies would be important. Also, there is a website called www.mekanizmalar.com that has a bunch of great videos showing a tons of different types of mechanical configurations for solving problems. If your building things from scratch that is.

thanks :)
the only problem is that if I have a problem the I 1st have to get the technical term for it and then translate from dutch to english and then I know how it works..



Whenever I help someone getting started in 3d printing I have them check out Reprap.org. This is by far the best resource on anything to do with printing. Like others have stated you need to determine what technology you are looking to use. I personally like SLA printers just for the fact the accuracy is a little better. Now if you aren't comfortable with lasers you could always use a dlp projector.

to be honest am not uncomfortable with lasers but I already did some research and some ideas before posting on this friendly forum if I've to change from a FDM to SLA then all my research was for nothing and I have to start again.
I also would like to make a FDM printer because when something goes wrong my dad is there to help me (He knows a lot about these kind of things but I want to do as much as possible with out his help because when he starts on something he'll try to finish it as fast as possible and as good as possible and that means making the project by himself)


Someone mentioned ball screws earlier and these will give you better results but like they said is a little slower. Another thing to think about is possibly using a closed loop system as most printers(FDM) are open loop with looses a little accuracy as it has no way of tracking where it is to where it should be. Now saying that most wouldn't be able to tell.

sorry but I do not understand the term open/closed loop system D:


The current market is driving the kit prices down, making them a better price that procuring pieces on there own.

buying a 3D printer is cheating in my opinion



and does someone knows if it is necessary to build a calibrating thing on a 3D printer or do the programs have that build-in?

James
02-21-2014, 04:49 PM
I used to draw perspective/manga back in the day but I gave up very quickly.
nha being able to draw a thing does not mean being able to build it I think.

Give it some more years. Eventually you will come to know so much about how the world works that you will one day have no problem whatsoever when it comes to building anything you want to build. I'm making this prediction based on how your drawings look right now and what kind of person can make those kinds of drawings and what ultimately becomes of a person who can make those kinds of drawings. :)




thanks!
[1 hour later]
do you perhaps know where I can find some video tutorials?

Yeah, it just came out a few months ago so there are not too many videos out for it, but you can try looking for SpaceClaim videos. DesignSpark Mechanical and SpaceClaim are the same software. The only difference is SpaceClaim has a lot more advanced features.

Also, you can try posting your questions here (http://www.designspark.com/discuss/viewforum.php?f=70) and either myself or one of the other forum members will answer your questions. Don't give up! :D You can even send me a personal message on here if you want.




yea I found out about this yesterday but thanks posting anyways .
Great! You're learning quickly! :D




buying a 3D printer is cheating in my opinion....but those open source plans are very helpful :)

Yes, that would be cheating, but you're on a time constraint, so in that regard it's not cheating too much. :p




no, i've never heard about Shapeways before thanks :)
Oh cool! I'm so happy to tell you that then! :D




haha yea the wooden shoes :P
do you know why the dutch used them?
if no then -> they used the wooden shoes to prevent cows/horses and other heavy animals from standing directly on their feets, early safety shoes actually :P

No I didn't know that! I always wondered about that! Wow! The Dutch are so smart! They impress me all the time! Everybody in the world had the same problem, yet only the Dutch came up with a good solution for it. :D

Come to think of it, when I was seven years old a horse stepped on my foot, so I'm one that knows all about the pain that is involved with that! :D

Xienix
02-21-2014, 05:00 PM
oops....can an admin delete this post
thanks :)

Xienix
03-11-2014, 10:14 AM
*ugh* sorry for the late reaction again, I had a sh*t load of test the last 2 week


Give it some more years. Eventually you will come to know so much about how the world works that you will one day have no problem whatsoever when it comes to building anything you want to build. I'm making this prediction based on how your drawings look right now and what kind of person can make those kinds of drawings and what ultimately becomes of a person who can make those kinds of drawings. :)

haha we'll see what the future brings


Yeah, it just came out a few months ago so there are not too many videos out for it, but you can try looking for SpaceClaim videos. DesignSpark Mechanical and SpaceClaim are the same software. The only difference is SpaceClaim has a lot more advanced features.

thanks but I've heard photoshop cc just released an update (14.2) which adds a new feature to photoshop cc. You can now connect your 3D printer to your pc/laptop and import what ever 3D file you have and print it via photoshop
so that enables me to make 3D models in 3Ds max and print the via photoshop cc



Also, you can try posting your questions here (http://www.designspark.com/discuss/viewforum.php?f=70) and either myself or one of the other forum members will answer your questions. Don't give up! :D You can even send me a personal message on here if you want.

as soon as I've cannot find the answers to my questions on the internet then I'll try :P

Xienix
07-31-2014, 05:29 AM
explanation in one sentence where I have been the last few months (for the 2 people remembering me)
school kept us busy
so...we're back, made some changes to the design, sorted out the arduino program, decided which electronics to use
long story short, we'll be done way before the deadline

b4 we start ordering everything I'd like to know if this (some pictures http://i.imgur.com/LGU1UHi.jpg http://i.imgur.com/LVagosg.jpg http://i.imgur.com/Q5VOwgQ.jpg) stepper motor is any good (not sure if measurements were needed)

a friend of mine bought them for 2 euros(which is about $2,70) a piece, I think he bought 8 of them.
(3 for the printer itself and 1 for the extruder, we're planning to make 2 3D printers btw)

keep in mind we're planning to build a delta 3D printer...

anyways is it any good?